05 May


Bacon Cheddar Scallion Scones

Bacon Cheddar Scones

May 30: National Scone Day

Our typical tea time tray includes sweet treats. But we decided to try something savory and substantial, such as bacon cheddar scallion scones, instead. Similar to bread-biscuits, they add balance to the sweet scones we normally have with our tea. For a fuller and formal tea time, add finger sandwiches, desserts and scones—sweet and savory—and make this meal a big deal! Or for a simple snack, bake bacon cheddar scallion scones on National Scone Day.

Recipe

(Adapted from King Arthur Flour)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold and cut into small pieces
  • ½ cup cheddar cheese, grated
  • ½ cup bacon, cooked and crumbled
  • ¼ cup scallions, finely chopped (green part only)
  • 6 tablespoons heavy whipping cream or milk

Directions

Grate the cheese, cook and crumble the bacon and chop the scallions. Set aside. In a separate bowl, combine the flour, salt and baking powder.

Bacon Cheddar Scones

Add the sugar to the flour mixture. Cut in the butter pieces and mix until they resemble coarse crumbs. Stir in the grated cheese, bacon and scallions. Gradually add the cream or milk (more or less may be needed, depending on your kitchen temperature and humidity). The scone dough should be able to stick together. If it is too dry, add a little more milk. If it is too wet, add a little more flour.

Bacon Cheddar Scones

Form the dough into a ball. Transfer to a clean surface dusted with flour. Pat the dough ball into a disc. Gently flatten to ¾ inch thick. Place the disc on a lightly greased baking sheet. Use a sharp knife to cut into eight wedges. Spread them apart from each other so they do not stick together when they rise slightly while baking. Brush the tops with a little cream or milk. Bake in a preheated oven at 425 degrees F at 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from the oven. Cool on the pan. Separate the wedges. Arrange on a tea tray. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Bacon Cheddar Scones

Notes

  • National Scone Day is observed in Australia on May 30 but we join the mates Down Under by posting this recipe in the blogosphere and World Wide Web!
  • Bacon may be fried to a crisp, then chopped finely. We used fully-cooked bacon from the package and chopped it up. Real bacon bits (found in the salad section of the grocery store) may also be used.
  • Scallions/green onions may be substituted for snipped fresh chives.
  • Wedge-shaped scones are traditional but the dough may be cut in rounds as well.
  • Search our blog for other scone and tea time recipes.

Cactus Meringue Cookies

Cactus Meringue Cookies

May 5: Cinco de Mayo

When Islander and her brother were in Arizona for a work conference a few years ago, they took a break from some of the sessions and went sightseeing in Phoenix, Sedona and the Grand Canyon. They enjoyed the drive through the desert and imagined that the saguaro cacti were waving to them! The tour guide even stopped along the way and picked a prickly pear for us as a succulent snack.

Some cactus plants are edible and are characteristic of Southwestern and Mexican cuisine. Below are a few nopales photographed outside of Islander’s brother’s house and some being sold at a grocery store in Texas.  

Nopales

However, it is the distinctive saguaro shape that inspired us to create cute cactus cookies for a fiesta. We also make cactus meringue cookies for Cinco de Mayo celebrations! Olé.

Recipe

(Based on our Meringue Skeleton Bones post)

Ingredients

  • 3 egg whites
  • ¼ teaspoon cream of tartar
  • pinch of salt
  • 2/3 cup sugar (granulated white)
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla (we used Mexican vainilla)
  • green food coloring
  • green sugar sprinkles
  • pink fondant flowers (see a similar tutorial here or here)
  • pink tube frosting
  • yellow tube frosting

Directions

With a handmixer or in a stand mixer, beat the egg whites with the cream of tartar and pinch of salt until fluffy. Gradually add the sugar and continue to beat until shiny.

Cactus Meringue Cookies

Stir in the vanilla. Mix in the food coloring. Fill a pastry bag fitted with a medium star tip with the meringue. Trace the cactus pattern on top of a parchment paper-lined cookie sheet. Start tracing with the cactus’ left arm, then the right arm and finish off with a downward middle stroke.

Cactus Meringue Cookies

Remove the pattern from underneath the parchment paper. Sprinkle with green sugar. Bake in a preheated oven at 200 degrees F for an hour. Turn off the oven and leave the meringues to dry for another hour. Remove from the oven and carefully peel off the meringues from the parchment paper.

Cactus Meringue Cookies

Make the fondant flowers and let dry. Attach to the meringues with a dab of pink frosting. Finish by piping a small round center with yellow frosting. Seal in an airtight container in a single file. When ready to serve, arrange in single file on a platter. Avoid stacking them or the meringues might stick to each other. Yield: Approximately 2 ½-3 dozen cactus meringue cookies.

Cactus Meringue Cookies

Notes

  • Download our cactus pattern here.
  • Saguaro cactus flowers, when in bloom at night, are white and yellow. But we colored our fondant flowers in the shade of prickly pear pink.
  • Humidity affects this recipe. Leave the cactus meringue cookies in a warm oven for a dry, crisp dessert. Otherwise, our friends have told us that the soft meringues still taste delicious as they melt in your mouth like a marshmallow.
  • Muchas gracias to Phyllis S. for helping to make the fondant flowers for our cactus meringue cookies. For a review of making fondant flower cutouts, please see our posts here or here.

Coconut Macaroons

Coconut Macaroons

May 31: National Macaroon Day

Islander is nuts about coconuts! After all, she grew up on an island surrounded by coconut trees. To feed the family with the fruit, her Daddy would use a long pole with a knife attached to the end of it and extract the young coconuts from the tree. He would chop off the top of a coconut, stick a straw in it or pour the liquid in a glass and the family would drink fresh coconut water. After that, he would crack the coconut open and we would spoon out the flesh to eat the soft meat. Daddy would also grate the older and firmer coconut meat so Mommy could transform them into a variety of tropical treats.

Coconut Macaroons

Islander misses coconuts from Hawaii and must make do on the mainland when she finds coconut products at the grocery store. Sometimes, she makes coconut macaroons because these chewy cookies remind her of a similar dessert her Mommy used to make back home. Try these tropical treats when craving coconut flavors, especially on National Macaroon Day.

Recipe

(Adapted from Martha Stewart’s Cookies)

Ingredients

  • 3 cups finely shredded coconut, unsweetened
  • ¾ cup sugar (we used C&H brand, granulated white)
  • 3 egg whites, room temperature
  • 1/8 teaspoon coarse salt (we used Hawaiian sea salt)
  • 1 teaspoon coconut extract

Directions

In a large bowl, mix the coconut, sugar, egg whites, salt and coconut extract. Blend well until all the ingredients stick together.

Coconut Macaroons

Cover the bowl and chill overnight in the refrigerator. Line baking sheets with parchment paper. Use a small scoop to drop the coconut cookie dough about an inch apart from each other. Chill in the refrigerator for 15 minutes. Bake in a preheated oven at 10-12 minutes or until they begin to brown a bit. Remove from the oven and let cool. Remove from the parchment paper. Store in airtight container at room temperature. Serve in mini-muffin/cupcake papers (optional).

 Coconut Macaroons

Notes

  • Macarons and macaroons? We have made both before for our blog. Although they are both cookies, macarons most often are referred to the Parisian-style almond meringue treats (see our Mac Attack page) while macaroons are known as the coconut cookies. Read about the different spelling and more about “macarons vs. macaroons” at The Kitchn site.
  • Coconut water and coconut juice? Unlike macarons and macaroons, coconut water and juice are one and the same. However, some companies that are selling them tend to add some unnatural preservatives in the drink. Learn more at the same Kitchn site.
  • Search our blog for more recipes containing coconuts.

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