Filipino Chicken Curry

January 12: National Curried Chicken Day

We have cooked different chicken curries for our blog before. But Islander seems to have gone back to the basics with her family’s Filipino-style chicken curry recipe for National Curried Chicken Day. This tasty dish is sometimes served at Filipino buffets and fiestas.

The Philippines were ruled by the Indianized kingdom of the Hindu Majapahit, Khmer Empire and Buddhist Srivijaya for 2,000 years before the islands were colonized by Spain. There is still a big population of Indians in some areas. Thus, the Indian culture has influenced Filipino cuisine. This recipe fuses Indian curry spices with sour patis (Filipino fish sauce) to give this dish its distinct flavor.

For a Filipino fusion food, try this Pinoy-style chicken curry recipe on National Curried Chicken Day.


  • 1-2 pounds chicken legs or thighs
  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • 2 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 1 small onion, quartered
  • 2 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 tablespoon patis (fish sauce)
  • 3 tablespoons curry powder
  • 1 cup water
  • ½ – 1 cup baby carrots
  • 1 can (14 ounces) coconut milk
  • 1 bell pepper, cut into large squares
  • Salt and pepper to taste


Prepare the vegetables by cutting the potatoes, onion and bell peppers. Set aside.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large pot. Cook the potatoes on medium high heat for about 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally so they don’t stick to the pot. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. In the same pot, add 1 tablespoon of oil and lightly brown the chicken pieces. Add the onions and garlic to the chicken and sauté until the onions have softened. Season with patis (fish sauce).

Sprinkle in the curry powder. Stir well with the water. Add the carrots and potatoes. Cover, lower the heat to medium and simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Stir in the coconut milk. Mix in the bell peppers. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Cook for another 10 minutes. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Serve hot with rice.


  • Bottled patis (fish sauce) may be found in the Asian section of some grocery stores or in Asian markets.
  • Search our blog for more chicken curry recipes.
  • Find more Filipino recipes under the ethnic section of our Theme Menus.


Lentil Soup with Lemon


January 6: National Bean Day

We are but a few days into the new year and our resolution to eat healthier is fulfilled with this recipe for lentil soup with lemon. In some countries (like Italy, Hungary and Lebanon), these lucky legumes are considered an auspicious new year’s food. The beans’ flat and round shape resembles coins and, when cooked in liquid, the lentils plump up, symbolizing growing wealth. Health and wealth in a bowl are a wonderful way to ring in the new year as well as celebrate National Bean Day!


Adapted from Sol S.


  • 1 pound lentils (preferably red lentils), rinsed
  • 6 cups water (or chicken or vegetable stock)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 5+ cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • ¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves, chopped


In a large pot, bring the water to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium. Add the lentils and cook covered for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a pan. Saute the chopped onions and minced garlic until soft and fragrant.


Add the onion-garlic mixture to the lentils. Stir in the ground cumin. Simmer for 10 minutes. Stir in the lemon juice and cilantro leaves. Ladle into soup bowls and serve hot with flat breads.



  • Lentil soup with lemon is also a good recipe to make during January (National Soup Month). We also like to eat lentil soup on Lent Fridays—it is simply delicious while fasting from meat dishes.
  • Thanks to our Syrian chef friend, Sol. S., for sharing this recipe with us.
  • Search our blog for more bean and soup recipes.

Egg Nog White Russian


December 24: National Egg Nog Day

Sip on a seasonal cocktail on Christmas Eve! Add a twist to the traditional White Russian by mixing in egg nog instead of cream or milk in a martini glass. Rim it with cinnamon-sugar for a festive flavor and top this delicious drink with a dollop of whipped cream for a snowy center. Egg Nog White Russian is perfect on National Egg Nog Day and the night before Christmas.


(Adapted from Spec’s)


  • Cinnamon-sugar (to rim martini glass)
  • 2 ounces vodka
  • 2 ounces coffee liqueur (we used Kona coffee liqueur)
  • 2 ounces egg nog
  • whipped cream
  • grated nutmeg


Rim the edge of a martini glass with cinnamon-sugar. Set aside. In a shaker, pour the vodka, coffee liqueur and egg nog. Shake well.


Pour into martini glass. Garnish with whipped cream and grated nutmeg (optional).



  • Try the recipe for Gelatina de Rompope (Mexican Egg Nog Gelatin) for a Christmas Eve dessert on National Egg Nog Day.

Winter Solstice Cocktail


December 21: Winter Solstice

‘Tis the season to toast the shortest day of the year with a Winter Solstice cocktail. The citrusy spirit is refreshing and it is fizzy and festive for holiday entertaining. Garnish this drink naturally with the Christmas colors of green and red (mint leaf and raspberry). Then bid farewell to fall and welcome winter with a Winter Solstice cocktail.


(Adapted from Martha Stewart)


  • 1 ½ ounces orange vodka (we used Clementine vodka)
  • ½ ounce orange-flavored liqueur (we used Triple Sec)
  • ½ ounce fresh lemon juice
  • ice cubes
  • club soda, chilled
  • 1 mint leaf
  • raspberry


In a shaker, combine the orange vodka and orange-flavored liqueur, lemon juice and ice.


Shake well and pour into a highball or martini glass. Fill with club soda. Garnish with mint leaf and raspberry. Serve immediately.



  • Thanks to Cathy M. for giving us some Meyer lemons from her backyard for this cocktail recipe. She had an overabundance of fruit and they were huge and ripe this season.
  • In addition to or in lieu of the cocktail, celebrate the solstice with a wintery sweet soup, ginataan bilo-bilo, during the Dōng Zhì Festival.
  • Search our blog for other holiday beverages and recipes.

Oatmeal Raisin Banana Muffins

December 19: National Oatmeal Muffin Day

If you are dashing through the snow/sun or having a harried holiday, grab a quick and healthy snack—oatmeal raisin banana muffins—to give you some energy to get through the day’s errands, such as buying last-minute Christmas gifts. These muffins are also good to serve to guests with fresh fruit for a simply wholesome breakfast when they visit during winter break. So make some muffins with oatmeal for National Oatmeal Muffin Day.


(Adapted from Chiquita Bananas)

For the topping

  • ¼ cup rolled oats (old-fashioned or quick cooking)
  • ¼ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice or ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted

For the oatmeal raisin banana muffins

  • 2 bananas, overripe and mashed
  • 1 egg
  • ¾ cup buttermilk
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup rolled oats (old-fashioned or quick cooking)
  • ¾ cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice or ground cinnamon
  • ½ cup raisins


In a small bowl, combine the oats, pumpkin pie spice or ground cinnamon, brown sugar and melted butter. Mix until well combined. Set aside.

In a medium bowl or mixer, mash the bananas with the egg. Stir in the buttermilk. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine the flour and oats mixture.

Add the brown sugar, baking soda, baking powder and salt.

Stir in the pumpkin pie spice or ground cinnamon. Stir in the wet ingredients and mix until moistened. Fold in the raisins. Scoop the mixture into cupcake papers.

Sprinkle the topping on each muffin. Bake in a preheated oven at 400 degrees F for 15-20 minutes. Remove from the oven. Serve warm. Store leftovers in an airtight container. Reheat if desired.


  • Make buttermilk at home by mixing 1 tablespoon of white vinegar or fresh lemon juice in a cup of milk. Let stand at room temperature until the milk curdles and thickens. Stir ¾ of this buttermilk mixture into the recipe and discard the rest.

Biscuits and Sausage Gravy

December 14: National Biscuits and Gravy Day

May 14 marks National Buttermilk Biscuits Day. Seven months later, it’s National Biscuits and Gravy Day. When we make buttermilk biscuits, we usually eat them with butter or fruit spreads. This time we smothered them with a creamy white pork sausage gravy for a filling weekend breakfast/brunch. Buttermilk biscuits and sausage gravy are popular where we live in Texas and is a quintessential Southern staple because of their down home deliciousness. Make them for breakfast or brunch and especially on National Biscuits and Gravy Day.


(Adapted from Food Network)

  • buttermilk biscuits (homemade or canned)
  • 1 pound pork sausage (we used Jimmy Dean brand regular sausage)
  • 1/3 cup flour
  • 3+ cups milk
  • salt and pepper to taste


While baking the buttermilk biscuits, crumble pork sausage into a skillet. Cook over medium high heat until the meat is no longer pink. Gradually mix in the flour. Lower the heat to medium low and pour in two cups of milk.

Keep stirring until thickened then add another cup of milk (at least five minutes). For a thinner gravy, pour another cup of milk and keep stirring. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve with warm buttermilk biscuits.


Coconut-Lime Matcha

Hangover Helper

December 2: Feast Day of St. Bibiana

Have a hangover from holiday partying? Then get inspired by the “Coconut” song and invoke St. Bibiana (Vivian), patron saint of hangovers, for a home remedy.

If you put de lime in de coconut water and mix it all up with matcha powder, it will help relieve a bellyache and headache. This hangover helper keeps you hydrated from the electrolytes in the coconut water and provides a little pain relief from the caffeine in the earthy-flavored green tea powder. Limes can also quell the queasiness and add vitamin C to stabilize your blood sugar levels.

Personally, we have no need to drink this hangover helper as we aren’t too into the bar scene. But as designated drivers at a few holiday parties, we could offer this coconut-lime matcha hangover helper to those who have imbibed a little too much. Or you can also sip on this healthy concoction on the morning of the Feast Day of St. Bibiana for a natural boost of energy! Cheers!


(Adapted from Shape magazine)


  • 1 cup coconut water, chilled
  • pinch of sea salt (we used Hawaiian sea salt)
  • 1 teaspoon matcha (green tea powder)
  • spritz of lime juice from a slice or wedge (also optional garnish)


In a small glass, pour the coconut water. Add a pinch of sea salt. Mix in the matcha. Spritz a little lime juice and stir. Garnish with a lime slice or wedge.


  • St. Bibiana died as a martyr (4th century) for her steadfast Christian faith. According to some legends, she was forced to drink liquid lead as part of her torture. After she was buried, healing herbs grew from her gravesite and were known to cure headaches, epilepsy and even hangovers! (We highly doubt that the healing herb was matcha since tea bushes were not grown in Rome.)
  • Take care during the holidays and don’t drink and drive!