Chick-in-Eggs

Chick-in-Eggs

April: Easter Week

We dress up deviled eggs as little devils after Halloween, on November 2, National Deviled Eggs Day. But around the Easter season, we make special spring chicks because they look so cute cracking out of their shells.

Eggs are festive food this time of the year as they are symbolic of transformations. The dead of winter is reborn into the hope of spring; the rising of Jesus from the dead represents new life; yolks turn into yummy appetizers.

Do deviled eggs differently during Easter Week and decorate them as spring chicks! Blessings to all our blog readers on Easter!

Recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 hard boiled eggs, cooled and shelled
  • 2-3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder (or to taste)
  • carrot sliver
  • black food gel tube

Directions

Boil, cool and shell the eggs. Slice a little piece off the bottom of an egg so it could stand on its own. Slice the egg 1/3 from the top, making the bottom 2/3 larger.

Chick-in-Eggs

Remove the yolks to a mixing bowl. Use a sharp paring knife to cut triangular “cracks” from the top and bottom of the egg whites. Set aside. Add mayonnaise and curry powder to the egg yolks and mash with a fork until smooth.

Chick-in-Eggs

Generously fill the bottom of the egg whites with a mound of the yolk mixture (we used a pastry bag fitted with a large round tip). Cap off with the top egg whites. Peel a small part of a carrot. Cut out into tiny triangles for the beaks. Position them on the egg yolks. Lightly touch the tip of the black tube frosting to make the eyes. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Chick-in-Eggs

Notes

  • Thanks to Lisa L. for the idea of decorating our deviled eggs into spring chicks.
  • Knead the black tube icing and squeeze out the excess liquid on a napkin before decorating the chick-in-eggs to avoid runny smears on the yolk filling.
  • Search our blog for other Easter and egg recipes.

Chocolate Bunny Butts

Chocolate Bunny Butts

March 31, 2013: Easter

As a reward for surviving Lent (and giving up chocolate for 40 days), Islander gets a chocolate bunny from Highlander as an Easter gift. Whether it is a hollow or solid candy bunny (she likes the latter better!), Islander can indulge in all that chocolate goodness after sacrificing sweets for a few weeks.

As an alternative to chocolate bunnies, Chocolate Bunny Butts are a differently delicious dessert made with deviled food cookies, miniature marshmallows and melted chocolate.  They look especially cute with colorful candy eggs—and they are quick and easy to make.

Eat an Easter fun food and have a Chocolate Bunny Butt. Hoppy Happy Easter from HI Cookery!

Recipe

(Inspired by Hungry Happenings)

Ingredients

Directions

Place the bunny head pattern on a cookie sheet. Lay waxed paper over it. Melt the chocolate according to the package directions. Cool slightly.

Chocolate Bunny Butts

Flatten a miniature marshmallow. Dip one flat side in the melted chocolate. Attach it to the cookie. Fill with melted chocolate a pastry bag outfitted with a round decorating tip (or fill a plastic bag and snip off a small hole in the corner). Carefully trace the bunny head pattern with the melted chocolate leaving a small tab at the end.

Chocolate Bunny Butts

Place in the refrigerator to cool and harden the chocolate. Carefully peel off the bunny heads from the waxed paper. Use the remaining melted chocolate to attach the cookie to the head. Refrigerate to set the chocolate. Arrange the dessert on a platter and serve.

Chocolate Bunny Butts

Notes

  • Download a PDF of our bunny head pattern here.
  • Search our blog for other Easter or egg recipes.

Greek Red Easter Eggs

(κόκκινα αυγά)

Greek Red Easter Eggs

April: Easter Season

Christos Anesti! Christ is risen! This is a beautiful Greek greeting on Easter morning exclaiming that our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ is alive in our hearts!

Eggs are a popular symbol for the spring and Easter season because they represent rebirth and resurrection. Many are dyed in vibrant hues but traditional Greek eggs (kokkina avga) are red as a reminder of His Precious Blood shed for all.

We used natural instead of commercial dyes to color our eggs—by boiling them with the liquid extracted from red onion skins! Red eggs may be placed in a pretty basket, hidden for an egg hunt, used to decorate a braided bread or simply eaten on Easter.

The Greeks sure got a great idea to use red eggs for evangelization! Happy Easter!

Recipe

(Adapted from About.com – Greek Food)

Ingredients

  • red or yellow skins from 5-8 onions
  • 3 -4 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar
  • 6 eggs
  • vegetable or olive oil (for polishing the red eggs)

Directions

Peel off the skins from the onion and place in a large stainless steel pot full of water. Add the vinegar and bring to a boil. Lower the heat, cover the pot and simmer for half an hour. Strain the red liquid into a glass bowl.

Greek Red Easter Eggs

Allow the red liquid to cool. In a pot, place the clean eggs in one layer. Pour the red liquid over the eggs to cover them. Boil the eggs for 10-15 minutes but no longer than 20 minutes.

Greek Red Easter Eggs

Carefully transfer the red boiled eggs to a glass bowl. Pour the remaining liquid over them and cool to room temperature. Gently dry the eggs on paper towels. Lightly polish the shells with a little oil. Refrigerate the eggs until ready to use.

Greek Red Easter Eggs

Notes

  • We acquire extra onion skins that fall off in the bins at the grocery store and place them in the plastic bag with our onions.
  • For deeper color eggs, cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate the eggs in the red liquid for a few days. We recommend dyeing the eggs on the day Jesus died (Good Friday). Then refrigerate in the red liquid. On the third day, the red eggs are ready when the Lord rose (Easter Sunday).
  • The natural dye will stain plastic or wooden utensils and plates. Use stainless steel or glass when coloring the eggs and paper towels when wiping spills or polishing with oil.
  • When our friend Olga W. came to celebrate Easter with us, she and Islander played a Greek game with the red eggs. Although she was influenced by the Russian Orthodox Church, she is familiar with some Greek Orthodox traditions, such as tsougrisma. Two players tap each other’s red egg in an attempt to crack it. The winner whose egg did not crack first is believed to be blessed throughout the coming year. (By the way, Olga won.)
  • Olga brought over braided bread and decorated it with red eggs for an edible Easter tradition in both Russian and Greek Orthodox churches.
  • Eastern (Greek, Russian, etc.) Orthodox Easter is celebrated on a date different than Western Christian churches; sometimes the dates coincide with the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Check the chart for future dates of Easter.
  • Easter eggs may be naturally dyed in other colors using a variety of vegetables, fruits, spices, herbs, etc. See the “ingredients” list on About.com – Chemistry site.
  • Search our blog for other Easter and egg recipes.

Easter Nests

Easter Nests

April 24: Easter Sunday 2011

Colorful eggs are some of the symbols of Easter and spring. Just as Jesus’ rising from the dead represents new life to Christian believers, so do the eggs signify the birth of spring chicks. To celebrate the “reason for the season,” we made an easy, edible Easter treat—noodle nests cradling candy-coated pastel eggs. Easter nests are cute and creative to cook with kids and they brighten up a buffet table at Easter and spring get-togethers.  Blessings to all our blog readers on Easter.

Recipe

(Adapted from Pioneer Woman)

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup butter
  • 2 cups mini marshmallows
  • 4 cups dried chow main noodles
  • candy eggs

Directions

Mist a muffin tin/cupcake pan with cooking spray. In a large bowl, microwave the butter and marshmallows until melted. Stir well. Gently fold in the noodles.

Easter Nests

With buttered or greased fingers, press the noodle mixture into each cup of the pan.  Push up towards the sides and leave a well in the middle. Let set for several hours before removing from the pan and filling with the candy eggs. Yield: One dozen nests.

Easter Nests

Notes

  • Place Easter Peeps yellow chicks on the nests to look like they are laying candy eggs.
  • Stick a toothpick with names written on placecards on each nest for a festive table setting.