Hawaiian-Style Chex Mix

Hawaiian Style Chex Mix

March 7: National Cereal Day

Put some pizzazz in a plain party chex mix and add some aloha with meaty macadamia nuts and flavorful furikake. Hawaii’s locals love to sprinkle the latter on snacks, such as “hurricane popcorn” and Spam musubi. The salty-sesame rice seasoning balances the sweetness of the sugar-syrup in the cereal mixture. Try something deliciously different for your next social gathering and for National Cereal Day—mix it up with macadamia nuts and furikake for an onolicious Hawaiian-style chex mix! Aloha!

Recipe

(From Auntie Maria B.)

Ingredients

  • ½ cup (1 stick) butter
  • ½ cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup light corn syrup
  • 1 box rice chex cereal
  • 1 box corn chex cereal
  • 2-4 cups macadamia nuts
  • 1 bottle furikake (nori fumi or nori komi)

Directions

In a saucepan, melt the butter over low heat. Add the vegetable oil, sugar and corn syrup. Mix until well combined.

Hawaiian Style Chex Mix

Line two large baking pans with foil. Mist with cooking spray. Combine the rice and corn chex cereals with the macadamia nuts and divide evenly into the two pans. Pour the sugar-syrup over the cereal mixes, dividing evenly between both pans.

Hawaiian Style Chex Mix

Mix with a spatula. Sprinkle furikake. Bake in a preheated oven at 225 degrees F, stirring every 15 minutes, for one hour. Remove from the oven and let cool, stirring every so often to prevent the ingredients from sticking together. Store in an airtight container until ready to serve.

Hawaiian Style Chex Mix

Notes

  • Mahalo to Auntie Maria B. for the recipe as well as the macadamia nuts and furikake that she sent to us from Hawaii.
  • Fond of furikake? Then try furikake on fish (mahi mahi)!

Furikake Mahi Mahi

Furikake Mahi Mahi

October: National Seafood Month

Islander’s brother, Kahuna, often got together with fellow Hawaii club members at his university in the Pacific Northwest. The homesick students would share their favorite island foods with each other, “talk story,” jam on their ukuleles and have impromptu hula dances. It was a nice study break and a chance to connect with others in their culture.

Kahuna would cook his favorite furikake mahi mahi (crispy fried fish seasoned with salt, sesame and seaweed). It was always a popular potluck dish on the mainland as it reminded Hawaii “expatriates” of the “onolicious” furikake mahi mahi plate lunches back home.

Occasionally, Kahuna gets requests to cook the dish for friends and family here on the mainland. We asked him to prepare furikake mahi mahi for our blog post to commemorate National Seafood Month. Mahalo nui  loa to Kahuna for being a guest chef on HI Cookery.

Recipe

(Adapted from Hawaiian Electric Company)

For the furikake mahi mahi

  • Mahi mahi fillets
  • 1 egg white
  • ¼ cup water
  • ¼ cup milk
  • ¼ cup flour
  • ¼ cup cornstarch
  • 1 cup nori komi furikake seasoning
  • 1 cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
  • ¼ cup peanut oil

Cut the mahi mahi into 3-ounce size fillets. In a plate, combine the furikake and panko.

Furikake Mahi Mahi

In a bowl, mix the egg white, water, milk, flour and cornstarch to make a smooth batter. Dip the mahi mahi pieces into the batter.

Furikake Mahi Mahi

Roll into furikake-panko mixture. Heat the oil in a skillet. Fry both sides of the mahi mahi until golden brown, being careful not to cook and dry the fish. Drain on paper towels. Serve hot with dipping sauce (optional).

Furikake Mahi Mahi

For the dipping sauce

  • ½ cup soy sauce (we used Aloha Shoyu brand)
  • ¼ cup water
  • ¼  sugar
  • ½-inch piece of ginger, crushed
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon water

In a bowl, mix the soy sauce, ¼ cup water, sugar, ginger and garlic. Cover and let stand for at least two hours to allow the flavors to blend together. Simmer in a small saucepan  over medium heat. In a small measuring cup or ramekin, make a thickening paste by mixing the cornstarch with the 1 tablespoon of water. Stir into the sauce mix until thickened. Discard the ginger and garlic. Serve with the furikake mahi mahi.

Furikake Mahi Mahi

Notes

  • Kahuna has cooked furikake ahi (tuna) in the same manner. Read the difference between the fishes ahi and mahi mahi here.
  • Look for nori komi furikake seasoning at Asian grocery stores.

Hawaiian Hurricane Popcorn

Hurricane Popcorn

January 19: National Popcorn Day

How’zit?! Befo’ time, when Islandah and her bruddah, Kahuna, wen go movies togeddah in Hawaii, they sneak da mochi crunch an’ furikake insai their pockets. Den afta they ordah da popcorn wit’ da buttah on top, they go mix ‘em in da dark theater and make da kine populah snack called “hurricane popcorn.” Bumbye, da concession stands start fo’ sell ‘em cuz local peoples like ‘em—get buttah, mochi crunch, furikake and sometimes li hing mui powdah in da popcorn already. No can find hurricane popcorn on da mainland but. Now Islandah goes to one Asian food mart fo’ buy mochi crunch an’ furikake so she can make ‘em at home when she like watch movies on da TV. Fo’ National Popcorn Day, try make one ono kine local grindz like Hawaiian hurricane popcorn. It’s garanz ballbaranz diff’rent but delicious! Aloha!

Click to hear Islander speak about hurricane popcorn in Pidgin (Hawaiian Creole):

Recipe

(Inspired by Hawaii Popcorn Company)

Ingredients

  • 1 packet of microwavable popcorn, popped
  • 2-3 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1-2 tablespoons nori komi furikake seasoning
  • ½ cup of arare mochi crunch (Japanese rice crackers)

Directions

In a large bag or container, combine the popped popcorn with melted butter. Close the bag or container tightly and shake the contents until well coated.

Hurricane Popcorn

Add the furikake seasoning and mochi crunch and shake again. Transfer to a bowl or individual serving containers.

Hurricane Popcorn

Notes

  • We used Reynolds brand oven bags in which to shake the hurricane popcorn ingredients.
  • For a sweeter hurricane popcorn, add some li hing mui powder to taste or use kettle corn flavor.
  • Before smiling, check your teeth for furikake plaque.
  • Mahalo nui loa to Islandah’s parents, Auntie Maria B. and sistah Nan N. for sending care packages from Hawaii, which include ingredients for hurricane popcorn.