Arare Cookies

(Japanese Rice Cracker Cookies)

Arare Cookies

October 1: Homemade Cookies Day

In a previous post in pidgin (Hawaiian creole language), we put mochi crunch in popcorn to make Hawaiian hurricane popcorn. We also add arare in cookie dough to make a uniquely-flavored “salty-sweet-crumbly-crisp” cookie.

Mochi crunch and arare are often used interchangeably but both refer to the bite-sized Japanese rice crackers. Japanese immigrants brought them to Hawaii when they came to work on the sugar plantations. Locals love these snacks made of glutinous rice and soy sauce and eat them straight out of the package or use them as an ingredient in other foods, such as hurricane popcorn and arare cookies.

Make the most of mochi crunch and bake a big batch of arare cookies for Homemade Cookie Day.

Recipe

(Adapted from Honolulu Star-Bulletin)

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups (3 sticks) butter, softened
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1 tablespoon shoyu (soy sauce)
  • 1 egg
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1 ¾ cup rice cereal (we used Kellogg’s Rice Krispies)
  • 1 ½ cups arare mochi crunch (we used Tomoe brand), crushed

Directions

In a zipper-top plastic bag, place the arare and crush into crumbs with a rolling pin. Set aside while preparing the cookie dough.

Arare Cookies

In a mixing bowl, cream the butter with the brown sugar. Mix in the baking soda, vanilla and soy sauce.

Arare Cookies

Beat in the egg. Gradually add the flour. Fold in the rice cereal. Add the crushed arare. Mix until all the ingredients are incorporated into the dough.

Arare Cookies

Pinch out one-inch balls and place on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper (optional). Space them about two inches apart. Slightly flatten each ball. Bake in a preheated oven at 350 degrees F for 10-12 minutes or until golden. Remove from the oven and let cool for five minutes on the cookie sheet before transferring to a wire rack. Cool completely to a crisp. Store in an airtight container. Yield: Approximately 6 dozen cookies.

Arare Cookies

Notes

  • Mahalo nui loa to Islander’s Daddy for buying the arare at the Pearl Harbor commissary for us.
  • Arare may be found in Asian food markets on the mainland. Make sure that the mochi crunch are still crisp and not stale by checking the manufacturing date on the package.
  • Search our blog for other homemade cookie recipes.

Hawaiian Hurricane Popcorn

Hurricane Popcorn

January 19: National Popcorn Day

How’zit?! Befo’ time, when Islandah and her bruddah, Kahuna, wen go movies togeddah in Hawaii, they sneak da mochi crunch an’ furikake insai their pockets. Den afta they ordah da popcorn wit’ da buttah on top, they go mix ‘em in da dark theater and make da kine populah snack called “hurricane popcorn.” Bumbye, da concession stands start fo’ sell ‘em cuz local peoples like ‘em—get buttah, mochi crunch, furikake and sometimes li hing mui powdah in da popcorn already. No can find hurricane popcorn on da mainland but. Now Islandah goes to one Asian food mart fo’ buy mochi crunch an’ furikake so she can make ‘em at home when she like watch movies on da TV. Fo’ National Popcorn Day, try make one ono kine local grindz like Hawaiian hurricane popcorn. It’s garanz ballbaranz diff’rent but delicious! Aloha!

Click to hear Islander speak about hurricane popcorn in Pidgin (Hawaiian Creole):

Recipe

(Inspired by Hawaii Popcorn Company)

Ingredients

  • 1 packet of microwavable popcorn, popped
  • 2-3 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1-2 tablespoons nori komi furikake seasoning
  • ½ cup of arare mochi crunch (Japanese rice crackers)

Directions

In a large bag or container, combine the popped popcorn with melted butter. Close the bag or container tightly and shake the contents until well coated.

Hurricane Popcorn

Add the furikake seasoning and mochi crunch and shake again. Transfer to a bowl or individual serving containers.

Hurricane Popcorn

Notes

  • We used Reynolds brand oven bags in which to shake the hurricane popcorn ingredients.
  • For a sweeter hurricane popcorn, add some li hing mui powder to taste or use kettle corn flavor.
  • Before smiling, check your teeth for furikake plaque.
  • Mahalo nui loa to Islandah’s parents, Auntie Maria B. and sistah Nan N. for sending care packages from Hawaii, which include ingredients for hurricane popcorn.