Lavender-Lemon Scones

May 30: National Scone Day

This post is dedicated to Nan N., Islander’s BFF and bridesmaid from a quarter century ago, whose favorite color and scent is lavender. The hue is a delicate shade of purple and the smell is beautifully relaxing—all kind of mellow, just like Nan. So it is sweet reunion whenever we go home to Hawaii knowing she will be there for us no matter what. There is no drama, just a secure and stable feeling to have in a friend when there is so much change, quick paces and extremes in life. Everyone needs an even-keeled friend like her and we are blessed with the simplicity yet deep bonds of a relationship we share.

This lavender-lemon scone is also well-balanced. Sometimes the floral notes of the lavender might overpower another strong flavor like lemon/citrus. But not in this scone. The lavender and lemon complement each other well. It makes our kitchen smell so delightful while it is baking, too! The glazed topping sweetens the scone like a crowning glory (an ode to Nan’s fascination with royalty). These scones are an elegant addition to a teatime table.

Cheers to true and long-lasting friendships! Cheers to lavender-lemon scones on National Scone Day!

Recipe

(Adapted from Tea Time Magazine)

For the lavender-lemon scones

  • 2 cups self-rising flour
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ¼ cup (4 tablespoons) cold unsalted butter
  • 2 teaspoons dried culinary lavender
  • Zest of one small lemon (or 1 teaspoon)
  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup cold heaving whipping cream
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

In a large bowl, combine the flour and sugar. Cut the butter into small pieces. Use a pastry cutter to mix the butter into the dough until it resembles peas.

Add the lavender and lemon zest to the flour mixture. In a measuring cup, beat the egg into the cream.

Stir the vanilla into the cream-egg mixture. Pour into the flour mixture and lightly combine until a dough sticks together. Transfer onto a clean, floured surface. Pat together to form a ball, then flatten gently into a disc. Flour the rolling pin and roll the dough to ½ inch thickness.

Use a 2 ¼ inch round cutter to cut out the scones, re-rolling scraps as necessary. Place onto a parchment paper lined baking sheet about two inches apart. Bake in a preheated oven at 350 degrees F for 15 minutes (the scones will have a pale brown top when done). Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack.

For the glaze topping

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 4-6 teaspoons milk

Directions

In a small bowl, combine the powdered sugar with the milk and mix until smooth and creamy.

Spread the glaze over the top of each cooled scone. Optional: sprinkle 3 pieces of dried lavender on top before the glaze sets. Serve immediately. Store leftovers in a tightly sealed container (best eaten within a day or two).

Notes

  • For more scones recipes, click on our Themes Menu tab and scroll down to the scones section.

Sundried Tomato, Basil

and Feta Cheese Scones

May 30: National Scone Day

Most of the scones recipes we feature on our blog have been sweet ones. But we are slowly adding more savory scones recipes on our list, such as this one with sundried tomatoes, fresh chopped basil, crumbled feta cheese and black olives (optional). They look like tender American biscuits with a subtle Italian flavor—a testimony to the international impact of the humble Scottish scone! For National Scone Day, mix up something savory—make tomato, basil and feta cheese scones.

Recipe

(Adapted from RecipeLand)

Ingredients

  • 1½ cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • pinch of black pepper
  • ¼ cup very cold unsalted butter, chopped into small pieces
  • ½ cup + 2 tablespoons buttermilk
  • ¼ cup sundried tomatoes, drained of oil and chopped finely
  • ¼ cup fresh basil leaves, chopped
  • ½ cup feta cheese, crumbled
  • ¼ cup black pitted olives, drained and chopped (optional)

Directions

In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, salt and pepper.

Cut in the butter and mix until the flour resembles large peas. Stir in the buttermilk and gently mix until the dough is moistened. Avoid overmixing the dough or the scones will be hard instead of tender. Add the chopped sundried tomatoes.

Stir in the basil leaves and feta cheese. Mix well until the dough comes together. Add a little buttermilk if it is too dry; add a little flour if it is too wet.

Turn out the dough on a clean, floured surface. Roll out to 1-inch thickness. Cut into 2-inch rounds (or triangle shapes). Place on greased baking sheet lined with foil. Brush tops with a little buttermilk. Bake in a preheated oven at 400 degrees F for 20-25 minutes or until browned on top. Remove from the oven. Serve warm with butter. Yield: Approximately 9 scones.

Notes

  • Islander is not fond of olives so she omitted them in this recipe. But Highlander likes them so she adds them to these savory scones on occasion.
  • Search our blog for more scones (both sweet and savory) recipes.

Double Ginger Scones

May 30: National Scone Day

Highlander’s Mum pronounces “scone” like the word “con” but we say it like “cone”. Either pronunciation is acceptable—and it also depends on the region, according to studies and surveys.

Highlander’s Mum is from Ontario, Canada. Her father (Highlander’s grandfather) emigrated from Scotland, where scones originated. Scone is pronounced like “con” there and in the majority of Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Canada. In the Republic of Ireland, Italy and USA, people pronounce scone like “cone”.

Inspired by the double pronunciation of scone, we made double ginger scones for National Scone Day. This recipe has both crystallized ginger and ground ginger as ingredients, which make this scone a spicy sweet treat for teatime.

Now, how do you pronounce scone?

Recipe

(Adapted from Tea Time Magazine)

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour, all purpose
  • ½ cup sugar, granulated white
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons (½ stick) butter, cold salted, cut into small pieces
  • 3-5 tablespoons crystallized ginger, chopped finely
  • 1 egg yolk
  • ¾ cup almond milk, unsweetened
  • sliced or slivered almonds

Directions

In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar and baking powder, ground ginger and salt. Cut in the cold butter and mix into the flour with a pastry blender until it resembles coarse crumbs.

Blend in three tablespoons of chopped crystallized ginger. In a separate cup, beat the egg yolk with almond milk. Pour in the milk mixture into the flour and blend until smooth, being careful not to overwork the dough. Turn out dough onto a clean, slightly floured surface. Knead four or five times (if too dry, add a little more almond milk mixture; if too wet, add a little more flour).

Roll out to ¼ inch thickness and cut with a 2-inch round fluted cutter, re-rolling the scraps as necessary. Place scones two inches apart on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Top with extra chopped crystallized ginger and almonds. Bake in a preheated oven at 350 degrees F for 20 minutes or until golden brown, testing with a toothpick for doneness. Remove from the oven and transfer to a wire rack. Serve warm.

 Notes

  • We like to get our ginger overload by drinking lemon ginger tea with double ginger scones.
  • Search our blog for other scones recipes.