Queen Elizabeth’s Drop Scones

October 12, 2018: The Royal Wedding Day of Princess Eugenie of York and Jack Brooksbank

Those who live on the west side of the Atlantic Ocean and are planning to follow the second British royal wedding of the year must wake up really early to watch any news reports due to time differences. A simple British-inspired breakfast with tea and scones would make still-sleepy fans rise and shine for the celebration of marriage between Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank (a low-key event compared to her cousin Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding on May 19).

We have made many royal recipes for our blog before and are now including Queen Elizabeth’s own drop scones for this occasion. Also known as Scotch pancakes (which are basically like American-style “silver dollars”), Her Majesty served these to U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower when he visited her at Balmoral Castle in Scotland in 1959. Her old family recipe is included in the National Archives.

Drop scones/Scotch pancakes/silver dollars are a perfect option for celebrating the royal wedding early in the morning or for a tea time breakfast or brunch. Congratulations to Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank on their wedding day!

Recipe

(Adapted from Town and Country magazine)

Ingredients

  • 3 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 3 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • 2 eggs
  • 4 tablespoons sugar (superfine preferred)
  • 1 ½ cups milk
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted (we used European/Irish style unsalted butter)

Directions

In a bowl, combine the flour, baking soda and cream of tartar. In another bowl, beat the eggs with the sugar. Add half the milk. Gradually mix in the dry ingredients.

Mix in the remaining milk and melted butter. Drop by tablespoonsful on a greased griddle/skillet/pan on medium high heat. Do not overcrowd the pan if cooking in batches. Use a spatula to flip the scone on the other side when bubbles appear. Cook until golden brown. Transfer to a plate lined with paper towels. Serve warm with jam, jelly, clotted cream, butter or syrup.

Notes

  • Queen Elizabeth’s original recipe uses teacups for measurements. We have converted them to modern cup measurements above.
  • Search our blog for other royal recipes filed under the British/English/Tea Time section of our Theme Menus.

Bacon Cheddar Scallion Scones

Bacon Cheddar Scones

May 30: National Scone Day

Our typical tea time tray includes sweet treats. But we decided to try something savory and substantial, such as bacon cheddar scallion scones, instead. Similar to bread-biscuits, they add balance to the sweet scones we normally have with our tea. For a fuller and formal tea time, add finger sandwiches, desserts and scones—sweet and savory—and make this meal a big deal! Or for a simple snack, bake bacon cheddar scallion scones on National Scone Day.

Recipe

(Adapted from King Arthur Flour)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold and cut into small pieces
  • ½ cup cheddar cheese, grated
  • ½ cup bacon, cooked and crumbled
  • ¼ cup scallions, finely chopped (green part only)
  • 6 tablespoons heavy whipping cream or milk

Directions

Grate the cheese, cook and crumble the bacon and chop the scallions. Set aside. In a separate bowl, combine the flour, salt and baking powder.

Bacon Cheddar Scones

Add the sugar to the flour mixture. Cut in the butter pieces and mix until they resemble coarse crumbs. Stir in the grated cheese, bacon and scallions. Gradually add the cream or milk (more or less may be needed, depending on your kitchen temperature and humidity). The scone dough should be able to stick together. If it is too dry, add a little more milk. If it is too wet, add a little more flour.

Bacon Cheddar Scones

Form the dough into a ball. Transfer to a clean surface dusted with flour. Pat the dough ball into a disc. Gently flatten to ¾ inch thick. Place the disc on a lightly greased baking sheet. Use a sharp knife to cut into eight wedges. Spread them apart from each other so they do not stick together when they rise slightly while baking. Brush the tops with a little cream or milk. Bake in a preheated oven at 425 degrees F at 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from the oven. Cool on the pan. Separate the wedges. Arrange on a tea tray. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Bacon Cheddar Scones

Notes

  • National Scone Day is observed in Australia on May 30 but we join the mates Down Under by posting this recipe in the blogosphere and World Wide Web!
  • Bacon may be fried to a crisp, then chopped finely. We used fully-cooked bacon from the package and chopped it up. Real bacon bits (found in the salad section of the grocery store) may also be used.
  • Scallions/green onions may be substituted for snipped fresh chives.
  • Wedge-shaped scones are traditional but the dough may be cut in rounds as well.
  • Search our blog for other scone and tea time recipes.

Currant Scones

Currant Scones 

May 30: National Scone Day

Of all the scone recipes we have tried, these currant scones are Highlander’s favorite because it is both flavorful and fragrant. They are also moist, light and lower in fat than other traditional currant scones. We bake them for breakfast, have them as a Scottish-style snack, eat them as a tea time treat and make them to commemorate National Scone Day.

Recipe

(Adapted from Great Good Food by Julee Rosso)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup currants
  • ¼ cup orange juice
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 cup low-fat buttermilk
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla

Directions

Plump up the currants by soaking them in orange juice for an hour. In a large bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder, baking soda and sugar. Blend in the buttermilk, canola oil and vanilla. Add the soaked currants with the orange juice. Do not overmix the batter or the scones will become hard.

Currant Scones

Using a small cookie dough scoop, drop the scones on a lightly greased baking sheet about two inches apart. Or fill halfway with batter the cavities of a buttered mini scone pan. Bake in a preheated oven at 350 degrees F for 12-15 minutes or until golden brown.  Remove from the oven and let cool on a wire rack. Scones may be served warm, if preferred.

Currant Scones

Notes

  • We halved the original recipe to serve just the two of us but bake the whole batch for breakfast when Highlander’s family comes to visit.
  • We bought our mini scone pan from Williams-Sonoma.
  • Search our blog for more scone recipes.

Cranberry Scones

Cranberry Scones

May 30: National Scone Day

Highlander’s Mum, a first generation Scottish-Canadian, often takes her tea with shortbread biscuits (cookies) or scones. The latter are a traditional Scottish teatime treat that is actually a sweet or savory quick bread and have become a popular snack at coffee shops as well. We usually make homemade scones for breakfast but also prepare them when Mum visits so we can relax together over a cup of tea or coffee. Although we have baked a variety of scones (recipes will appear in future blog posts), we chose to feature a simple sweet scone containing dried cranberries for National Scone Day.

Recipe

(Adapted from Taste of Home)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup flour
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • pinch of salt
  • ¼ cup cold butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 3 tablespoons milk
  • ¼ – ½ cup dried cranberries
  • coarse sugar to sprinkle on top of the scones

Directions

In a mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and pinch of salt. Cut in the cold butter pieces and mix until it has a crumb-like texture.

Cranberry Scones

In a small bowl, beat the egg. In a measuring cup, measure the milk. Then add two tablespoons of the beaten egg to the milk. Mix the egg and milk and pour into the crumb mixture. Blend until moistened. Add the cranberries and combine well.

Cranberry Scones

Place the dough onto a floured surface. Knead gently to form a 6-inch round. Slice into four wedges for large scones or eight wedges for mini scones. Separate the wedges. Place on a greased baking sheet. Brush the top of the scones with the remaning beaten egg.

Cranberry Scones

Sprinkle the tops of the scones with coarse sugar. Bakes in a preheated oven at 425 degrees F for 15-20 minutes or until brown, being careful not to burn the underside of the scones. Remove from the oven and serve warm with fruit preserves/jams or clotted cream.

Cranberry Scones

Notes

  • Australia celebrates National Scone Day on May 30. But we think this food holiday should go global!
  • Search our blog for other scone recipes.

 

Royal Scones

Royal Scones

April 29, 2011: The Royal Wedding Day of HRH Prince William of Wales and Catherine Middleton

The royal wedding is scheduled for 11 a.m. British time, which means it is even earlier in the morning to watch it on television or the Internet in most parts of America. While our friends in Europe may be having their lunches then, here we are having a basic breakfast of tea and scones. Highlander and Islander have had various scones before (search our blog for recipes), but the one we are featuring is Royal Scones from a royal chef’s cookbook to commemorate the historic day Wills marries Kate!

Recipe

(Adapted from Eating Royally by Darren McGrady)

Ingredients

  • 3 ¼ cups self-rising flour
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • ¾ – 1 ¼ cup milk
  • 1 cup raisins or currants

Directions

In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour and sugar. Cut in the butter and mix until it resembles coarse crumbs. Add the beaten egg in the center.

Royal Scones

Pour in ¾ cup of milk. Mix until it becomes a sticky dough. If it is too dry, add a little more milk 1/8 cup at at time. Add the raisins or currants and combine well. Press the dough into a greased scone pan or shape by hand into a traditional triangle shape.

Royal Scones

Bake in a preheated oven at 350 degrees F for 20-25 minutes, being careful not to burn or brown the edges too much. Remove from the oven. Transfer from the scone pan to a wire rack.

Royal Scones

Notes

  • If not using self-rising flour, use 3 ¼ cups all-purpose flour mixed with 4 teaspoons baking powder.
  • For a more muffin-looking scone, roll out the dough onto a floured surface to an inch thick. Use a 2-inch round cookie cutter or rim of a glass to cut out the scones. Place on a lightly greased baking sheet about an inch apart. Brush the tops with one beaten egg yolk. Bake as above.
  • Serve the scones warm with butter, jams or clotted cream.
  • We bought our mini scone pan from Williams-Sonoma.