Hawaiian Garlic Shrimp

June 8: World Oceans Day

Islander grew up on the south-central shore of Oahu. But sometimes she and her family went up to the North Shore for some reason or another. The drive was about an hour one way but the mauka and makai scenery was a nice distraction that made the trip seem shorter. While on the other side of the island, we would stop to eat at one of the many food trucks/lunch wagons that sold shrimp dishes (classic cocktail, sweet and spicy, lemon pepper, fried coconut and garlic butter flavors). They taste so ‘ono (delicious)!

While the North Shore shrimp trucks use fresh shrimp from the Kahuku farms, we use sustainable shrimp harvested from the world’s oceans to cook our mainland meals. When trying any of the seafood recipes posted on our blog, we encourage readers to use brands that practice ethical and sustainable fishing and farming methods (look for labels on the package).

Celebrate World Oceans Day with sustainable seafood and cook Hawaiian Garlic Shrimp. Aloha!

Recipe

(Adapted from I Love Hawaiian Food Recipes)

Ingredients

  • 12 jumbo shrimp, shelled and deveined, tails intact
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1/8 – ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • ½ stick butter
  • 12 cloves garlic, chopped
  • salt to taste
  • 2 tablespoon white wine
  • lemon wedges (optional garnish)

Directions

Rinse and pat dry the shrimp. In a pie plate, combine the flour, paprika and cayenne pepper. Dredge the shrimp in this mixture, shaking off the excess flour. In a large skillet, melt the butter over medium heat.

Saute the chopped garlic for about a minute. Then lay the shrimp on the bottom of the skillet. Sprinkle salt to taste and cook for about three minutes. Turn the shrimp over and cook for a few more minutes. Finish the dish with white wine, cook until slightly evaporated, the garlic has browned and the shrimp is reddish in color. Serve hot with scoops of white steamed rice garnished with lemon wedges.

Notes

  • Hawaiian Garlic Shrimp is a variation of our shrimp scampi. Search our blog for other seafood recipes.
  • After eating at the shrimp truck in the North Shore, we would head to Ted’s Bakery for dessert and have a slice of chocolate haupia pie. Try our copycat recipe here.
  • One of our favorite movies is Disney’s “Moana” (“Vaiana”), which means “ocean” is many Polynesian/South Pacific languages. It is fun to watch this film on World Oceans Day.
  • Islander’s hometown is ‘Ewa Beach. Her ‘ohana (family) would spend some Sunday afternoons at the nearby beach park, with a distant view of Honolulu and Diamond Head. While Daddy would grill something on the hibachi, she and her brother and Mommy would gather a little limu (seaweed) for a side salad to complete our supper menu.
  • Islander is partial to the Pacific as her home state of Hawaii is right in the middle of the ocean. She used to participate with her schools to do volunteer trash pickup in ‘Ewa Beach so the community’s park and shore would stay clean. Please keep ALL beaches beautiful by picking up your trash (especially plastic products) and pet waste! Protecting our oceans from land litter is one of the premises of World Oceans Day.

 

Ceviche de Camarones y Mango

Ceviche Shrimp y Mango

May 5: Cinco de Mayo

San Antonio, Texas, is famous for its fiestas. When we lived there for six super happy years, we celebrated by eating many Mexican dishes with our familia and friends, including ceviche, a dish that contains raw seafood “cooked” in citrus, usually limes or lemons, and tossed with tomatoes, onions, jalapeño peppers and cilantro. Since Islander is not too fond of fish, she found a ceviche recipe that contains shrimp cocktail. Mango is added to the mix for a vibrant color and a slightly sweet surprise. Ceviche de camarones y mango reminds us of the confetti inside the cascarones (eggs that we liked to smash especially on unsuspecting people’s heads!). This appetizer can be eaten alone or served with tortilla chips. On Cinco de Mayo, serve ceviche with shrimp and mango for a fun and flavorful fiesta.

Recipe

(Adapted from Whole Foods)

Ingredients

  • 25-30 medium-sized shrimp, raw, thawed, deveined and shelled (we used cooked cocktail shrimp; see Notes)
  • 1 cup red onion, finely chopped
  • 1-1 ½ cups tomato, diced
  • 1 semi-ripe firm mango, peeled, pitted and finely chopped
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, cored, seeded and finely chopped
  • 3-4 limes, juiced
  • ½ cup cilantro leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt

Directions

Rinse the shrimp and pat dry with paper towels and discard the tails. Cut into ½ inch pieces, reserving a few shrimp to garnish (optional). Chop the onion. Dice the tomatoes. Chop the mango (one cup) and jalapeño pepper.

Ceviche Shrimp y Mango

Place the chopped ingredients in a big bowl. Pour the lime juice over the mixture and combine well. Sprinkle with cilantro and salt and mix again. Cover and refrigerate for an hour to allow the flavors to develop and the citrus from the lime juice acid to “cook” the shrimp. Serve chilled in a margarita glass, garnished with shrimp. Or place in a small dish/bowl surrounded with tortilla chips.

Ceviche Shrimp y Mango

Notes

  • If raw seafood is a concern, replace with ready-to-eat cocktail shrimp.
  • Further the fiesta fun and serve ceviche de camarones y mango on National Shrimp Day on May 10.
  • Search our blog for other Mexican recipes. ¡Viva Fiesta!

Räksmörgås

(Swedish Shrimp Sandwich)

Swedish Shrimp Sandwich

May 10: National Shrimp Day

Islander used to work in a building across the street from an Ikea in Illinois. What a distraction it was to go to that Swedish furniture store (we bought a sofa sleeper, end tables, cabinets and shelving, benches and stools and a mirror from Ikea)!

Sometimes, Islander would take her lunch breaks at the Ikea cafeteria to sample some Swedish food, such as räksmörgås, an open-faced shrimp sandwich. It was light and refreshingly delicious.

Now that we currently live in South Texas, the closest Ikea is nearly three hours’ drive away—not too convenient to visit for browsing at furniture or eating at the café. So we make räksmörgås at home. These Swedish shrimp sandwiches are simple to make for a light lunch and in observance of National Shrimp Day. Smaklig måltid (bon appétit in Swedish)!

Recipe

(Adapted from Ikea)

Ingredients

  • Toasted bread (one per person)
  • Butter
  • Lettuce leaves
  • Boiled egg, shelled and sliced
  • Small frozen shrimps, thawed and patted dry with paper towels
  • 2-3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 2-3 tablespoons sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon fresh dill, chopped
  • lemon slices (optional garnish)
  • tomato wedges (optional garnish)

Directions

Toast the bread. Spread butter on one side. Place a lettuce leaf on top. Slice the eggs and layer it on top of the lettuce. Sprinkle the shrimps over the eggs.

Swedish Shrimp Sandwich

In a small bowl, mix together the mayonnaise and sour cream. Stir in the chopped dill. Carefully spread the mixture over the shrimp. Finish with dill on top. Garnish with lemon slices, tomato wedges and a sprig of dill (optional). Serve immediately.

Swedish Shrimp Sandwich

Notes

  • Variations of räksmörgås include adding mustard, thinly-sliced cucumbers, chopped chives, lemon garnish, tomato wedges and caviar.
  • Heavier breads, such as rye or pumpernickel, are recommended over the softer white varieties to be able to hold up the ingredients.
  • Search our site for other Swedish-inspired or shrimp recipes.

Honey Walnut Shrimp

Honey Walnut Shrimp

May 10: National Shrimp Day

An afternoon jaunt to Honolulu’s Chinatown after church was a Sunday shopping ritual for Islander and her parents when she was a little girl. Aside from the Pearl Harbor commissary, the vibrant Asian marketplace was her family’s alternate source for fresh produce, meat and seafood. Sometimes, they would treat themselves at one of the many Chinese restaurants where Islander would always order a shrimp dish. Among her favorites is Honey Walnut Shrimp. The origins of this recipe, whether from an American Chinatown, Canton or Hong Kong, is debatable, but the dish is no doubt delectable. Because the sauce is rich and creamy, Honey Walnut Shrimp is often served at Chinese banquets and on special occasions. One does not need to go to Chinatown to buy the ingredients or eat this dish at a Chinese restaurant or banquet hall. It is surprisingly simple to make at home and can be easily prepared in observance of National Shrimp Day.

Recipe

(Adapted from All Recipes)

Ingredients

  • ½ cup water
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ½ cup raw unsalted walnut halves
  • pinch of salt
  • 4 egg whites (we used ½ cup pasteurized liquid egg whites)
  • 2/3 cup cornstarch or mochiko (sweet rice flour)
  • 1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • vegetable oil for frying
  • ¼ cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon canned sweetened condensed milk
  • 2 tablespoons of honey

Directions
In a small saucepan, dissolve the sugar and salt into the water and bring to a boil. Drop in the walnuts and boil for five minutes until they begin to caramelize. Drain the liquid and let the walnuts dry on a cookie sheet covered with wax paper. In a medium bowl, beat the egg whites with the cornstarch/mochiko until a smooth batter is formed. Coat the shrimp in the batter.

Honey Walnut Shrimp

Deep fry the shrimp in hot oil until golden brown.  Remove with a slotted spoon, drain on paper towels and set aside.   Meanwhile, in a small bowl, stir together the mayonnaise, condensed milk and honey. Mix the sauce with the fried shrimp and caramelized walnuts. Transfer to a platter and serve.

Honey Walnut Shrimp

Notes

  • We have used liquid egg white brands such as Crystal Farms AllWhites and Egg Beaters Whites.
  • Use a combination of cornstarch and mochiko for a different texture on the shrimp coating.
  • Mochiko can be purchased at local Asian grocery stores. Check the package label as there is a distinction between plain and sweet rice flour. Use the latter for this recipe.

Asian-Style Shrimp Salad with

Sesame Seed Vinaigrette

Asian Shrimp Salad

May: National Salad Month

Whenever they got Fridays off from work, Islander and her Daddy would walk to the neighborhood open market in the morning and buy fresh shrimp and Hawaii homegrown greens. Combining these ingredients into a salad made for a nice light lunch together that afternoon.

For National Salad Month, we have posted one of our old favorite salad recipes: an Asian-style shrimp salad that is tossed with a sesame seed vinaigrette and topped with crispy won ton strips.

Recipe

For the salad

  • Lettuce, spinach or other leafy greens (equivalent of 3-4 individual salad servings)
  • Sliced tomatoes, onions, carrots or other complementary colored vegetables
  • Crispy won ton strips (we used Hawaii Candy brand)
  • 1 tablespoon of butter
  • 12+ raw shrimps, shelled and deveined

For the dressing

(Dressing adapted from Hawaii Candy)

  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • dash of ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons red wine or balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons sugar (we used C&H brand, granulated white)
  • 1 tablespoon minced parsley
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

Directions

In a large bowl, mix the leafy greens and the vegetables.  Set aside. Make the dressing by combining all the ingredients in a shaker. Pour into the salad and toss well. Serve in individual salad plates.

Asian Shrimp Salad

Melt the butter in a small pan. Add the shrimps and saute until the color turns pink. Do not overcook. Drain on paper towels. Top the salad with cooked shrimps. Sprinkle with crispy won ton strips.

Asian Shrimp Salad

Notes

  • May 10 is National Shrimp Day and our Asian-style shrimp salad would be sensational to serve then, too!

Firecracker Shrimp

Firecracker Shrimp

December 20: National Fried Shrimp Day

With just a few days away from the new year (and only a couple of months until the Asian lunar new year), we are already in the mood to celebrate! The timing of National Fried Shrimp Day is another reason to cook festive Firecracker Shrimp. This auspicious appetizer makes a great yang alternative and brings balance to a holiday spread filled with a yin of Christmas cookies and confections.

Noisemakers and fireworks on New Year’s Eve are believed to scare away any evil spirits and bring good luck. Firecracker Shrimp is the perfect combination of crunchy (noisemaker) and spicy (firework) finger food to serve while celebrating on New Year’s Eve and National Fried Shrimp Day!

Recipe

(Adapted from New Asian Cuisine)

Ingredients

  • spring roll wrappers
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • shrimp (uncooked)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • ¼ cup sweet chili sauce

Directions

Defrost the spring roll wrappers, cut the stack diagonally with a sharp knife, separate the sheets, place in a container and cover with a damp cloth until ready to use. Meanwhile, mix the water and cornstarch together and set aside to use for sealing the wrapped shrimp.

Firecracker Shrimp

Shell and devein the shrimp (optional: leave the tail on). Straighten out the shrimp by slitting the inside curve in a few places but not cutting all the way through. Lay out the shrimp to dry on paper towels. Marinate in the sweet chili sauce for 10 minutes at room temperature.

Firecracker Shrimp

Season the shrimp with salt and pepper. Wrap each shrimp by placing it on the left side of a spring roll wrapper with the triangular point facing up. Fold the wrapper inward then bring the triangular point down. Roll tightly to the right as shown in the photos below. Seal with the cornstarch mixture.

Firecracker Shrimp

Place the wrapped shrimp on a baking sheet lined with wax paper. Freeze until firm. Transfer to a plastic freezer bag until ready to cook. Deep fry until golden brown and crispy. Drain on paper towels. Serve with sweet chili sauce as a dip.

Firecracker Shrimp

Notes

  • Although shrimp is sometimes considered a yin food, the deep-fried cooking method gives it a yang quality.  For a brief introduction and list of the chi nature of foods and their roots in Chinese and Asian holistic medicine, click here and here.
  • Search our blog for posts on other shrimp recipes.

Shrimp Scampi

shrimp scampi

April 29: National Shrimp Scampi Day

Shrimp scampi is one of Islander’s favorite foods! Every time she visits her parents back in Hawaii, her Daddy lovingly prepares this homecoming meal using fresh, succulent black tiger shrimp; calamansi (Philippine lemoncito) from the tree in the backyard; and a dash of Chinese five-spice powder for a unique twist to the classic recipe. On one of her visits home, she photo-documented her Daddy in the kitchen cooking this nostalgic dish for an especially meaningful blog recipe post for National Shrimp Scampi Day.

Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 dozen black tiger or jumbo shrimp
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon calamansi or fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • dash pepper
  • dash garlic powder (or granulated garlic)
  • dash Chinese five-spice powder (optional)

Directions

Wash, peel and devein the shrimp. Slit the back halfway toward the tail end of each shrimp. Set aside. Slowly melt the butter in a large pan on the stovetop. Pour the olive oil into the butter. Add the minced garlic.

shrimp scampi

Squeeze the calamansi or lemon juice in a strainer over the garlic butter sauce. Sprinkle the salt, pepper, garlic powder and Chinese five-spice powder. Stir everything well. Arrange the shrimp in the pan with the slit side down. Cook the shrimp until they are evenly colored (orange). Transfer the shrimp onto a platter. Pour the sauce over the shrimp. Serve hot with rice or pasta.

shrimp scampi