Mango Kulfi

(Indian-Style Mango Ice Cream)

Mango Kulfi

 June: National Mango Month

As a sweet ending to our savory and spicy meals at an Indian restaurant, we like to scoop up some mango kulfi in our buffet bowl. This is a brightly colored and intensely flavored Indian version of ice cream. Those who are “mad for mangoes” will surely care for some kulfi, especially during National Mango Month.

Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 cups canned mango pulp (kesar/saffron)
  • 1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 cup evaporated milk
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 3-5 cardamom pods (optional flavoring)

Directions

In a large bowl, mix the mango pulp with the condensed milk. Pour in the evaporated milk.

Mango Kulfi

Add the whipping cream and blend well. Stir in the cardamom pods, if using. Pour into a freezer-safe container. Cover tightly and freeze for at least six hours. Serve chilled.

Mango Kulfi

Notes

  • Kesar mango pulp contains saffron, which gives it a vibrant golden yellow color and a distinctively delightful taste.
  • If using cardamom pods, remove prior to serving.
  • Search our blog for more mango recipes.

Ceviche de Camarones y Mango

Ceviche Shrimp y Mango

May 5: Cinco de Mayo

San Antonio, Texas, is famous for its fiestas. When we lived there for six super happy years, we celebrated by eating many Mexican dishes with our familia and friends, including ceviche, a dish that contains raw seafood “cooked” in citrus, usually limes or lemons, and tossed with tomatoes, onions, jalapeño peppers and cilantro. Since Islander is not too fond of fish, she found a ceviche recipe that contains shrimp cocktail. Mango is added to the mix for a vibrant color and a slightly sweet surprise. Ceviche de camarones y mango reminds us of the confetti inside the cascarones (eggs that we liked to smash especially on unsuspecting people’s heads!). This appetizer can be eaten alone or served with tortilla chips. On Cinco de Mayo, serve ceviche with shrimp and mango for a fun and flavorful fiesta.

Recipe

(Adapted from Whole Foods)

Ingredients

  • 25-30 medium-sized shrimp, raw, thawed, deveined and shelled (we used cooked cocktail shrimp; see Notes)
  • 1 cup red onion, finely chopped
  • 1-1 ½ cups tomato, diced
  • 1 semi-ripe firm mango, peeled, pitted and finely chopped
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, cored, seeded and finely chopped
  • 3-4 limes, juiced
  • ½ cup cilantro leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt

Directions

Rinse the shrimp and pat dry with paper towels and discard the tails. Cut into ½ inch pieces, reserving a few shrimp to garnish (optional). Chop the onion. Dice the tomatoes. Chop the mango (one cup) and jalapeño pepper.

Ceviche Shrimp y Mango

Place the chopped ingredients in a big bowl. Pour the lime juice over the mixture and combine well. Sprinkle with cilantro and salt and mix again. Cover and refrigerate for an hour to allow the flavors to develop and the citrus from the lime juice acid to “cook” the shrimp. Serve chilled in a margarita glass, garnished with shrimp. Or place in a small dish/bowl surrounded with tortilla chips.

Ceviche Shrimp y Mango

Notes

  • If raw seafood is a concern, replace with ready-to-eat cocktail shrimp.
  • Further the fiesta fun and serve ceviche de camarones y mango on National Shrimp Day on May 10.
  • Search our blog for other Mexican recipes. ¡Viva Fiesta!

Mango Cake

Mango Cake

June: National Mango Month

“I love you like a mango…” go the lyrics in a popular Hawaiian song, “Drop, Baby, Drop,” performed by local artists, Sean Na’auao, Kapena and Mana’o Company. Although the words seem silly, those who are mad about mangos might understand how the singer compares his sweetheart with a sweet fruit!

Summer is mango season in Hawaii, and Islander’s family always hopes that their neighbor’s mango tree would drop some ripe fruit so we could pick them up for our enjoyment—with the neighbor’s permission, of course (and a trade for our tangerines when the trees are ripe in our yard).

When Highlander came to visit Hawaii for the first time many summers ago (and to declare his intent to the ‘ohana/family that he planned to marry Islander), he fell in love with mangos, too. But if Islander shares any of that golden goodness with him, he must serenade her with a few lines of that silly song!

For National Mango Month, we are featuring a mango cake. Even if you are not inspired by the loony lyrics, we still hope you love the fruit chunks and nectar in this recipe.

Recipe

(Adapted from HEB)

For the mango cake

  • 1 cup mango chunks, roughly chopped
  • 1 box plain yellow cake mix (we used Duncan Hines brand)
  • 3 eggs
  • ¼ cup light olive oil
  • 1 ¼ cup mango nectar

 Directions

Chop the mango chunks into small pieces. Set aside. In a large mixing bowl, combine the cake mix, eggs, oil and mango nectar. Blend until smooth.

Mango Cake

Add the chopped mango into the batter. Pour into a greased cake pan. Bake in a preheated oven at 350 degrees F for 35-40 minutes, testing with a toothpick for doneness. Remove from the oven. Cool completely before frosting.

Mango Cake

For the mango glaze

  • 1 cup mango nectar
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch

Directions

In a saucepan, pour in the mango nectar and bring to a slow boil. In a small bowl or cup, make a paste with the water and cornstarch. Stir the paste into the mango nectar. Mix well until smooth and thick. Remove from heat. Cool completely.

Mango Cake

For the whipped cream frosting

  • 2 cups (1 pint) heavy whipping cream
  • ¼ cup sugar

 Directions

In a large mixing bowl, whip the cream until peaks form. Gradually add the sugar. Continue to beat until stiff and fluffy. Spread the frosting on the cake and sides.

Mango Cake

Fill a pastry bag with the frosting. Using a round or star tip, outline the top edge of the cake to create a dam. Spread the mango glaze evenly over the frosting. Pipe criss-cross lines over the mango glaze. Change tips, if desired, and add decorative borders on the top and bottom edges of the cake. Refrigerate to set. Bring to room temperature before slicing and serving.

Mango Cake

Notes

Mango

Batida de Mango

Batida de Mango

June 12: International Cachaça Day

We contend that we are not cocktail connoisseurs (but Islander likes to bake with booze). When we celebrated Highlander’s birthday at a Brazilian restaurant one year, we tried caipirinha, the country’s national drink. The batida would be Brazil’s next best beverage. Both are made with cachaça, a spirit distilled from sugar cane juice. We eventually bought a bottle in the rum section of a liquor store. And since we are mad about mangoes, we made batida de mango to celebrate mango season and International Cachaça Day. Saúde! (Cheers!).

Recipe

(Adapted from 101 Blender Drinks by Kim Haasarud)

  • 2 ounces cachaça
  • 2 ounces sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 cup fresh mango, cut into chunks
  • 1 cup ice cubes

Directions

Combine the first three ingredients and mix well. Add the ice cubes and blend until smooth. Pour into a glass and serve.

Batida de Mango

Notes

  • Cachaça is pronounced “ka-sha-sa”. Caipirinha is pronounced “kai-pee-reen-ya”.  Batida is pronounced “ba-chee-da”. And saúde is pronounced “sow-ooh-jee”.