Bandage Cookies

Bandage Cookies

October 31: Halloween

Gross out your guests with graham cracker bandage cookies. With only three ingredients—graham crackers and white and red frosting—these sweet treats are so quick to make for any last-minute ghoulish get-togethers. For an even more bloody good time, make these bandage cookies to go with our other Halloween recipes, such as ribs, fingers, eyeballs, earwax, brain, bones, apple smiles and more. Happy Halloween!

Recipe

Ingredients

  • Graham crackers
  • White tube frosting
  • Red gel tube icing

Directions

With a sharp knife, carefully separate the graham crackers into quarters. For each cracker strip, squeeze out a square of white frosting from the tube. Next, add a little “blood” on the center with the red gel tube icing. Serve on a bed of cheesecloth stained in red liquid food coloring.

Bandage Cookies

Notes

  • There are several variations for creating these creepy cookies. Wafer cookies or club crackers may be used instead of the graham crackers. Square-cut fondant pieces or white cheese spread may be used instead of the white frosting center. And strawberry jam or jelly may be used instead of the red gel tube icing.
  • For the bloody bandage background, randomly smudge red liquid food coloring on cheesecloth and let dry.
  • Search our blog for other Halloween recipes.

Edible Earwax

Edible Earwax

October 31: Halloween

For a disgusting dessert on Halloween, serve edible earwax! These simple sweets are made with mini marshmallows on a lollipop stick and dipped with melted peanut butter chips. Try these tasty treats with our gelatin eyeballs and brain, apple smiles, meringue skeleton bones, freaky finger cookies and BBQ ribs for a “body parts” party on a fun-filled Fright Night.

Recipe

Ingredients

  • Mini marshmallows
  • Peanut butter chips (or peanut butter, honey, melted caramel or cheese, yellow-tinted white chocolate, etc.)

Directions

On a short lollipop stick, position and shape a mini marshmallow on each end. Dip in melted peanut butter chips. Let set on a sheet of waxed paper. Arrange on a clean towel with a cotton swab (such as Q-tips brand packaging) sign and simply serve to grossed out guests!

Edible Earwax

Notes

  • Add a little vegetable shortening to the peanut butter chips if needed to thin out to a more liquid consistency.
  • Search our blog for other Halloween recipes.

Halloween Ribs

Halloween Ribs

October 31: Halloween

Before indulging in sweets tonight, eat something savory-scary: Halloween ribs! This main dish is meaty and messy and makes for a disgusting-looking but delicious dinner. If hosting a Halloween party, guests will gross out on this gruesome grub.

Preparation of the ribs is simple but the presentation can be spectacularly spine-chilling! Our version is basic—just pork spareribs smothered in our favorite flavor of BBQ sauce with a fresh red bell pepper, accessorized with a knife, plastic skull and bloody cloth. Add cold cuts to the skull (flaying flesh) and mini-sausages (intestines) for an all-out appalling yet appetizing and bloody good buffet.

Cook a creative yet creepy food—ribs—for a Happy Halloween!

Recipe

Ingredients

 Directions

Cut the ribs in half. Season them with salt and pepper. Bake the ribs in a preheated oven at 400 degrees F until cooked. Half an hour before they are done, remove from the oven. Baste one side of the ribs with the sauce. Return to the oven and cook for another 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and baste the other side of the ribs with the sauce. Return to the oven and finish another 15 minutes.

Halloween Ribs

Arrange the ribs on a platter, placing a rack on opposite sides of each other (or slice between the bones and position them like racks). In between them, put a red bell pepper in the top center. Stick a sharp knife in the red bell pepper. Decorate around the platter with cheesecloth that has been stained with red food coloring. Place the platter on a table and position a plastic skull above the red bell pepper. Serve while the ribs are still hot.

Halloween Ribs

Notes

  • If using one rack of pork ribs, cut in half to make a shorter rib cage. We used St. Louis-style spareribs instead of baby back ribs for this recipe because they were larger and proportionate to the size of the plastic skull.
  • If serving more guests, use two racks of ribs for a longer rib cage. Although presentation is key, the ribs may be pre-cut and arranged on a platter for an easier self-serve buffet.
  • Optional: Below the bell pepper and under the spareribs, scatter some sausages (such as Lit’l Smokies) in BBQ sauce to look like intestines.
  • Optional: Cover a clean plastic skull with cold cuts (like deli-style, thin-sliced ham, roast beef, etc.) to look like decaying skin.
  • A plastic or toy knife may be used in place of the real sharp one for safety issues.